New York Specialized Schools

by NYC Firm Schools on September 28, 2009

New York Firm Schools and New York Specialized Schools offer many excellent and advanced academic options for NYC students. For those students who choose not to attend a Private School, there are the Specialized School options as well. In NY, all eighth and ninth graders can apply to and be matched with the public high school that best suits them, and includes applying for admission to one of the city’s Specialized High Schools. Keep in mind, however that applying to one of these schools requires taking the SHSAT.

The first three Specialized NYC Schools are: Stuyvesant, Bronx High and Brooklyn Tech:

Stuyvesant High School
Location: 345 Chambers St., New York, NY, 10282

Offers advanced courses in mathematics and science, including organic chemistry, calculus, qualitative analysis, astronomy, environmental studies, and history of science. Advanced Placement courses are offered along with mechanical arts and music programs. Extensive extracurricular programs offered including 22 athletic teams, 13 major publications and active student government. Currently ranked as one of the top high schools in the nation.

Bronx High School of Science
Location: 75 West 205 St. Bronx, NY 10468

Specializes in the sciences and offers advanced courses in numerous areas, including geometry, algebra, computer science, microbiology, computerized graphics, and medical illustration.
Students are provided opportunities for independent research along with extracurricular activities including orchestra and vocal music programs. Bronx Science has had more than twice as many finalists in the Intel Science Talent Search than any other school in the nation.

Brooklyn Technical High School
Location: S.Elliot Pl.and DeKalb Ave., Bklyn, NY 11217

Provides advanced education in engineering, the sciences, and computer science. Students take an academic core in the 9th and 10th grades and then choose from 1 of 12 major areas of concentration, ranging from Aerospace Engineering and Architecture to Graphic Communications and Computer Applications.

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