NYC Private School Students and Extra Tutoring

by NYC Firm Schools on April 8, 2010

The student to teacher ratios at most of the New York City Firm Schools is relatively small. This is considered one of the most beneficial aspects of a private school because it enables close interactions between students and teachers. There is no way to slip between the cracks and fail when you are noticed, front and center, and your work has provided continuous feedback. The teachers know each student personally and are expected to be aware of any problems and then contact the parents in order to work on a solution if there are academic issues that are not being addressed adequately in school alone.

When Student-Teacher Ratio Isn’t Enough

When a student is still struggling to keep up and the teacher and school are already working closely with them, it may be time to consider a private tutor. There is no stigma attached to hiring a tutor in order to help your child. At one point in every person’s life, often at multiple points, something that is easy for everyone else is difficult for you. It often takes that little extra push from someone to kick start the understanding process in the brain. If your child is having trouble with a subject, hiring a tutor to help your child temporarily may be your best plan.

When Parents As Teachers Need Help

Some parents express concern that they should be able to tutor their child themselves. While a parent’s intelligence is not the question, the training in teaching techniques often is. It may be better and easier for your child to learn from a tutor. It doesn’t mean that you cannot teach your child, just that sometimes it is best to call in the experts because they will know how to supplement what your child is learning at school and be able to explain the subject clearly in terms that are already known.

Many of the top students at prestigious NYC Firm Schools have received extra help from tutoring on subjects that were once difficult for them.

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